The Global Food Crisis: Science Solutions


27 October 2021
13:00 - 18:00 (GMT +3)


Forum Topics
Climate change and its impact on agri-food systems.
Issues related to global food safety.
The role of food packaging in a green economy.
Changing consumer behaviour in the face of the global food crisis.
The global food crisis has drawn international attention to the food security challenges posed by the devastating effects of climate change. As the damage related to climate change becomes virtually irreversible and increasingly ubiquitous, the time is ripe for decisive collective action. We must ramp up our efforts in assessing the safety of new technologies, in controlling food production and processing, and in protecting consumers, agriculture, public health, and antimicrobial resistance. To accomplish this, we must leverage the full range of scientific advances, risk assessment options, and digitalization avenues.

We will use this forum as a platform to identify global trends, challenges, and difficulties in solving the global food crisis. Together, we will discuss how to rationally apply existing technologies to address the global food crisis and create socially, environmentally, and economically sustainable agri-food systems in the face of climate change.

Speakers
Alan Moore (Мoderator)
Head of International Affairs
and Academic Mobility Office,
NUST MISIS,
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Simon Pearson
Founding Director of LIAT, The Lincoln Institute of Agri Food Technology,
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Steve Brewer
University of Lincoln, head of the project ''The Internet of Food Things Network, read more
Natalia Derkanosova
First Vice-rector, PhD, Professor, "Voronezh State Agrarian University named after Emperor Peter I",
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Ksenia Gerasimova
Affiliated Lecturer, Land Economy Department, University of Cambridge,
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Irina Kirsh
PhD in Chemistry, Associate Professor, Head of the Department "Industrial Design, Packaging Technology and Expertise", Director of the CCP "Perspective Packaging Solutions and Recycling Technologies" of Moscow State University of Food Production, read more
Mikhail Egorov
Head of the Department of Bioecology and Biological Safety, Moscow State University of Food Manufacturing,
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Anton Elemoso
Strategy Director, 3D Bioprinting Solutions (3D-bioprinting Solutions),
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Marina Lazko
Doctor of Biology, Professor, Astrakhan State University, Educational and Production Laboratory of Agroindustrial Technologies and Nutrition,
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Sean Field
PhD MSc BComm, Research Fellow, Center for Energy Ethics | Department of Social Anthropology, University of St. Andrews, read more
Konstantin Tuipakov
Dean of the Economics Department, Doctor of Sciences, Associate Professor, Kuban State Agrarian University named after I.T. Trubilin, Russia, read more
Howard Griffiths
Professor of Plant Ecology Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, read more
Vladislav Semipyatny
Researcher, PhD, Russian Research Institute of Dairy Industry,
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Vladimir Kuznetsov
Associate Professor at the Department of Non-Ferrous Metals Metallurgy, Head of NUST MISIS Master's program "Technologies and Materials of Digital Manufacturing", read more
Anastasia Semenova
Doctor of Technical Sciences, Associate Professor, Deputy Director for Research, V.M. Gorbatov Scientific Centre for Food Systems, the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia,
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Programme
Wednesday, 27 October, 13:00-13:10 (Moscow)/11:00-11:10 (GB)

Welcome! Video bridge

13:10 – 13:40 /11:10 11:40 Speakers' Presentations

Speaker Simon Pearson
Simon Pearson, Founding Director of LIAT, the Lincoln Institute of Agri Food Technology, UK

Topic: Digital and robotic transformation of the food system

Q&A
13:40 – 14:00 /11:40 12:00 Speakers' Presentations

Speaker Steve Brewer
Steve Brewer, Founding Director of LIAT, the Lincoln Institute of Agri Food Technology, UK

Topic: Lessons learnt from the interdisciplinary Internet of Food Things Network Plus in the UK

Q&A /Video Bridge
14:10 – 14:20 /12:10 12:20 Speakers' Presentations

Speaker Natalia Derkanosova
Natalia Derkanosova, First Vice-rector, PhD, Professor, Voronezh State Agrarian University named after Emperor Peter I, Russia

Topic: Evaluation of Potential of New Raw Materials in the Development of Healthy Food Products"

One of the national interests of the "Food Security Doctrine of the Russian Federation" is to provide the population with high-quality, safe and balanced food products. As part of this direction, systematic research has been carried out in the field of analyzing the potential of new raw ingredients – sources of dietary fiber to meet the requirements of healthy food products. Theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out and the regularities of the formation of the characteristics of food products through the use of agricultural raw materials with a proven level of safety, technological functionality and ingredient composition have been established. Mathematical methods and models of predictive evaluation of the influence of the quality and composition of the ingredients of flour mixtures on the formation of consumer properties of food products (for example, bakery products) were used to substantiate the prospects of raw ingredients.

Q&A
14:20 – 14:40 /12:20 12:40 Speakers' Presentations

Speaker Ksenia Gerasimova
Ksenia Gerasimova, Affiliated Lecturer, Land Economy Department, University of Cambridge, UK

Topic: Building up Resilience for Small-holder Farmers: New Challenges Under COVID-19 & Climate Change
The presentation will discuss how small holder farmers are affected by global food crisis resulting from the global warming and the ongoing pandemic. Two case studies will be analysed for empirical data: Chapsangor Coffee Cooperative, Nandi, Kenya, and tea cooperative Xinanyuan, Anhwei Province China. It will conclude with identifying areas where science can support farmers to successfully overcome the global crisis and adapt more resilient farming practices.

Q&A
14:40 – 15:40/ 12:40 –13:40 Panel Discussion
  • New challenges in the area of food safety
  • Creating food products with 3D bioprinting
  • 3D printingBio Packaging and Recycling Technologies: Perspective Solutions

Irina Kirsh

PhD in Chemistry, Associate Professor, Head of the Department "Industrial Design, Packaging Technology & Expertise", Director of the CCP "Perspective Packaging Solutions & Recycling Technologies" of Moscow State University of Food Production, Russia

Mikhail Egorov

PhD in Biology, Professor, Head of the Department of Bioecology & Biological Safety, Moscow State University of Food Manufacturing

Anton Elemoso

Strategy Director, 3D Bioprinting Solutions (3D-bioprinting Solutions)
15:40 – 16:00 /13:40 14:00 Speakers' Presentations

Speaker Marina Lazko
Marina Lazko, Doctor of Biology, Professor, Astrakhan State University, Educational & Production Laboratory of Agroindustrial Technologies & Nutrition, Russia

Topic: Ways to Reduce the Risk of Food Listeriosis in Cheese Production
Cheese on the world market is a highly valuable natural food product. In most affluent countries, the average per capita consumption of cheese is 10-15 kg, and in Italy, France and Israel - more than 20 kg per year. In Russia, this figure is a little more than 6 kg per year, with the recommended cheese consumption rate of 6.5 kg per year for the human body. The largest part of the cheese market is occupied by hard cheeses (65%), processed cheese (24%) is in second place, and only 11% are soft-ripened and sour-milk cheeses.

Milk for cheese manufacture is considered cheese-making if it has an optimal content not only of proteins, fat, SNF, calcium, but also certain microbiological indicators that allow it to be used without pasteurization processes.
Microbial content of milk for cheese production is characterized by both the total amount and the qualitative composition of the bacterial flora, specifically, the presence of gas-forming bacteria. The content of the latter in milk causes various defects.
Currently, one of the ways to ensure microbiological food safety is the risk reduction
of food-borne listeriosis, a disease caused by the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. Pregnant women, the elderly, and also people with immunodeficiency are especially susceptible to this disease. Listeriosis is characterized by high mortality in children and people with immunodeficiency.
Among enzyme dairy products, cheeses are the most susceptible to contamination with L. monocytogenes. According to the FDA, cheese made from unpasteurized milk is 50 to 160 times more likely to contain L. monocytogenes than cheese made from pasteurized milk. However, during the maturation of the cheese head, contamination of the product with L. monocytogenes is also possible.
Among enzyme dairy products, cheeses are the most amenable to contamination with L. monocytogenes. According to the FDA, cheese made from unpasteurized milk is 50 to 160 times more likely to contain L. monocytogenes than cheese made from pasteurized milk. However, during the maturation of the cheese head, contamination of the product with L. monocytogenes is also possible.

According to the FDA, cheese made from unpasteurized milk is 50 to 160 times more likely to contain L. monocytogenes than cheese made from pasteurized milk. However, during the maturation of the cheese wheel, contamination of the product with L. monocytogenes is also possible.

Biological control agents for L. monocytogenes have already been developed and are being produced in Western Europe and the United States of America. Intralytix (USA) produces ListShield, and Micreos (Netherlands) produces Listex. These funds were developed taking into account the L. monocytogenes isolates circulating in these countries. However, at present, the import of cheeses from Western Europe and the United States to the territory of the Russian Federation is excluded. Therefore, it is possible to predict an increase in the activity of domestic cheese producers, which will lead to the need to improve control over listeriosis.
The development and subsequent introduction into practice of the technology of biopreservation of the cheese wheel at the stage of its maturation will allow not only to completely preserve the nutritional value and taste of the cheese, but also to reduce the risk of sporadic cases and outbreaks of listeriosis, and, consequently, the risk of death.
The aim of this research is to development and test a technology for biopreservation of cheese at the stage of aging of a cheese wheel using a phage-containing composition.

The goal was achieved by solving the following tasks:
- development of a dosage regimen for a phage-containing composition for biopreservation of cheese at the stage of cheese wheel maturation;
- approbation of the effectiveness of the developed technology of biopreservation of cheese in the process of maturation of the cheese wheel
Q&A
16:00 – 16:20 /14:00 14:20 Speakers' Presentations

Speaker Sean Field
Sean Field, PhD, MSc BComm, Research Fellow, Centre for Energy Ethics | Department of Social Anthropology, University of St. Andrews, UK

Topic: Old Problems, New Context and Responses

A global food crisis has been unfolding for the last four decades. The current crisis is born from this legacy but is distinct, reflecting the present global predicament we find ourselves in. This presentation will reflect on the supply side origins of the global food crisis and how people are coping with it.

Q&A
16:20 – 16:40 /14:20 14:40 Speakers' Presentations

Speaker Konstantin Tuipakov
Konstantin Tuipakov, Dean of the Economics Department, Doctor of Sciences, Associate Professor, Kuban State Agrarian University named after I.T. Trubilin, Russia

Topic: Priority areas for food security

Q&A
16:40 – 17:00 /14:40 15:00 Speakers' Presentations

Speaker Howard Griffiths
Howard Griffiths, Professor of Plant Ecology Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge

Topic: Partnerships across the food system translate fundamental research to deliver best practice for policy development
The presentation will develop processes whereby networks of expertise in a given institution, and adjacent research institutes, can develop wide-ranging proposals when co-ordinated through an interdisciplinary hub, such as the Cambridge Global Food Security Initiative. The key lessons include the need to co-create the research proposal with strong academic partner institutions in collaborating countries. The emphasis will be on fundamental research (whether in sciences or social sciences) being used for capacity strengthening and translation into best practices. Outputs may be applied to rural communities, advising on the practicalities of sustainable systems for cropping, marketing and local supply chains, as well as geared towards advising on policy formulation for dissemination at regional and national levels.

Q&A
17:00 – 17:50/ 15:00 –15:50 Panel Discussion
  • New risks in food safety, identification & management
  • Digital passportization of identification profiles of food systems
  • Personal digital production: new relationship in the human-nature-technology system
  • Food safety management systems

Vladislav Semipyatny
Researcher, PhD, All-Russian Research Institute of Dairy Industry, Russia

Vladimir Kuznetsov
PhD, assistant professor, Department of Non-Ferrous Metals Metallurgy, Head of Master's Program "Technologies & materials of digital production" at NUST MISIS, Russia

Anastasia Semenova
Doctor of Technical Sciences, Associate Professor, Deputy Director for Research, V.M. Gorbatov Scientific Centre for Food Systems, the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia
17:50 – 18:00/ 15:50 –16:00 Closing of the Forum
Organisers and Partners
Contacts
university.alliance2021@gmail.com