Transnational Education (TNE):
Joint/Double/Dual Degrees

18 FEBRUARY 2021
13:00-18:00 (GMT+3)
Forum Topics
What are TNE and joint/double/dual degrees in legal terms?
Building a joint/double/dual degrees
Marketing and selling TNE and joint/double/dual degrees
Joint Educational Programs: status, problems, perspectives. Russian and UK cases
The area of transnational education (TNE) and joint/dual degrees has increasingly become valuable for universities. With the global talent market growing ever more competitive, the advantages of understanding and developing TNE and dual degree programmes is an obvious pathway for greater partnership between Russia and UK.

The forum session will explore the benefits of TNE on institutions, students, staff and the local community. Harnessing the benefits of TNE so that students, graduates, researchers, staff and policymakers develop a greater international outlook through mobility, capacity building, increased international collaboration and interaction with partners. The forum will also highlight the main problems faced by Russian and UK universities in the development and implementation of joint degree programmes.

Speakers
Timothy O'Connor
Vice-Rector of Academic Affairs National University of Science and Technology MISIS, read more
Alan Moore (Moderator)
Head of International Affairs
and Academic Mobility Office,
NUST MISIS, read more
Faina Zolotavina
PhD in Pedagogy, Associate Professor, Director of the Regional Center for Franco-Russian Cooperation of Tyumen State University, Chevalier of the Academic Palms Order of the French Republic, read more
Irina Liman
PhD in Economics, Professor, Head of the Department of Management and Business of the Financial and Economic Institute of Tyumen State University, read more
Vera Zabotkina
Vice-Rector for International Cooperation, Director of Center for Cognitive Programs and Technologies, Russian State University for the Humanities (RSUH), Moscow,
Member of the Academic Council of RSUH, read more

Karen Ottewell
Director of Academic Development & Training for International Students, University of Cambridge Language Centre, Fellow and Tutor (Graduate) of Lucy Cavendish, read more
Adam Doyle
UEL Director of Careers and Enterprise University of East London, read more
Mikhail Troitsky
Dean and Associate Professor, the MGIMO School of Government and International Affairs, read more
Olga Nizhevich
Administrative Head of ICEF Master's programme in Financial Economics, International College of Economics and Finance (ICEF), HSE University

Maria Vrublevskaya
Head of Strategic Planning and Development, St. Petersburg Polytechnic University of Peter the Great, read more

Yulia Grinkevich
Director for Internationalization
National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia, read more

Paul Inman
Pro-Vice-Chancellor (International), the University of Reading, member of the University Executive Board, read more

Alan Mackay
Deputy Vice-Principal International and Director of Edinburgh Global,
The University of Edinburgh, read more

David Law
Academic Director: Global Partnerships, Vice-Chancellor's Office
Keele University, UK, read more
Valeriy Rukavishnikov
Director of the Center for Training and Retraining of Oil and Gas Specialists, Deputy Director for Development, School of Natural Resources, Tomsk Polytechnic University
Programme
13:00−13:10 Welcome! Video bridge and welcoming words from Timothy O'Connor Vice-Rector of Academic Affairs, NUST MISIS, Russia
Moderator: Alan Moore
Head of International Affairs and Academic Mobility Office, NUST MISIS, Russia

13:10−13:50 Panel discussion (live streaming)

Timothy O'Connor, Vice-Rector of Academic Affairs NUST MISIS, Russia
Mikhail Troitsky, Dean and Associate Professor, the MGIMO School of Government and International Affairs, Moscow
Vera Zabotkina, Vice-Rector for International Cooperation, Director of Center for Cognitive Programs and Technologies, Russian State University for the Humanities (RSUH), Moscow, Member of the Academic Council of RSUH, Russia
Yulia Grinkevich, Director for Internationalization National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia

Questions for discussion:
1) What are some of the USP's for Dual/Joint Degrees?
2) Is there an advantage in a bilingual dual degree?
3) Will distance learning become more popular within TNE?
4) How are Russian universities set up to make the most of TNE ?
13:50−14:00 Quickfire questions (asked by Moderator) Video bridge

Moderator: Alan Moore, Head of International Affairs and Academic Mobility Office, NUST MISIS, Russia
14:00−14:20 Social and reputational effects of transnational education

Speaker: Maria Vrublevskaya
Head of Strategic Planning and Development, St. Petersburg Polytechnic University of Peter the Great, Russia


The presentation deals with a scope of explicit and implicit outcomes of mobility and dual-degree programs as a tool to make graduates more marketable and foster the university's reputation.
14:20−14:40 What motivates UK universities to develop TNE partnerships?

Speaker: David Law
Academic Director: Global Partnerships, Vice-Chancellor's Office Keele University, UK
The presentation will begin with the need to understand the kind of university that is seeking to develop a partnership (using 'mission group categories' to describe the UK sector). I will suggest the kinds of questions that a Russian university might wish to ask a possible partner from the UK. Reference will be made to the national context that I know best: the People's Republic of China. Behind the TNE hubs that have developed rapidly, there is often a dynamic and sustained government policy, as illustrated by China and some of the former Republics of the USSR. The big issue for successful relationships is whether both partners gain more than they invest. Governments often prime the pump, but sustainability normally requires private funding through tuition fees.
14:40−15:00 The New TNE – deeper strategic partnership after the pandemic?

Speaker: Paul Inman
Pro-Vice-Chancellor (International), the University of Reading, member of the University Executive Board, UK

Having worked with our strategic partner in Russia (MGIMO University), for over 10 years, we are confident in setting up double degrees and enabling mobility between the UK and Russia, in both directions. We have developed a number of double PhD, double Masters, undergraduate progressions and short courses that give students a dual perspective of two education systems and two countries, specialising in International Relations, Banking, Economics and Law.

However, the pandemic has brought new challenges for us all, and like most universities, we have responded by teaching our students at a distance, all over the world. In Russia, we have just conducted our first Russia/UK online PhD viva and even carried out virtual short course visits. As our relationship with MGIMO University has grown and strengthened, we have come to value the partnership more and more; for the bright and engaging Russian students, the academic collaborations, and the educational opportunities for our own students.

15:00−15:20 Dual Degree Programs as a Foundation for International Educational Teams in Higher Education Institutions (Case of a Joint Cooperation between Tyumen State University and European Universities

Speakers: Faina Zolotavina, Irina Liman
Faina Zolotavina, PhD in Pedagogy, Associate Professor, Director of the Regional Center for Franco-Russian Cooperation of Tyumen State University, Coordinator of Dual Degree Programs with French Partner Universities, Professor at the French Institute of the Embassy of France in Russia, Chevalier of the Academic Palms Order of the French Republic

Irina Liman, PhD in Economics, Professor, Head of the Department of Management and Business of the Financial and Economic Institute of Tyumen State University, Head of Master's Dual Degree Programs in Economics with Lorraine University and in Management with Strasbourg University Business School (France), Coordinator of Joint Educational Programs with Nord University (Bodo, Norway), Project Coordinator for implementation of International MBA program "Master of Business Administration" in Tyumen State University under the UK Government's BRIDGE Grant (UK, 2004-2006).

The development and implementation of joint research and educational programs is one of the key indicators of internationalization in higher education institutions. Since it was first mentioned in 2001 in Prague [1], the concept of dual degrees has been intensively developing, and today's global scientific and educational community has a firm understanding of the concept and its application in joint projects.
Today the Tyumen State University together with French universities (acting under international agreements on educational cooperation) offers Master's degrees in five dual degree programs in law, economics, management, linguistics, and computational mechanics with leading French universities: the University of Strasbourg, University of Lorraine, and University of Toulouse Jean Jaurès.

These programs are similar in organization and format, but there are differences depending on the major. What they have in common is that the training is conducted full-time simultaneously in two universities on a bilateral mobility basis. Upon successful completion of the program and master's thesis defense, the students shall receive state master's degree diplomas of the relative country (the Russian Federation / French Republic) on their major subject.
During the implementation of these international dual degree programs with two state diplomas, 66 graduates of Tyumen State University, including French students, received Russian and French master's degrees.

The prerequisite for the development of such programs is a long-term sustainable relationship with foreign partners. One of the first programs at the University was developed with the University of Wolverhampton: the joint MBA program "Master of Business Administration" under the UK Government's BRIDGE Grant (2004-2006). During the same period there were the EU Tempus and Erasmus+ projects, aimed at the development of training modules in various disciplines and their testing in the partner universities.
In the process of development and implementation of joint educational programs several general and specific tasks were resolved – related to the legislative requirements in different countries, the formation of a common information environment and cooperation ethics, etc.

Each project had its own specific features and difficulties, but the following benefits were discovered along the way: competitive growth of dual degree graduates; formation of professional competencies in demand in the international labor market; development of foreign language intercultural competence among students and teachers; experience in team and project work; expansion of educational resources.

In addition, such long-term and sustainable programs have allowed us and our partners to reach a new level of inter-university cooperation, specifically with joint supervision of graduate student training and the creation of international research groups.
________________________

[1] Communiqué of the Meeting of European Ministers in Charge of Higher Education. Prague, May 19
th


15:20−15:40 Transnational education in a changing world

Speaker: Alan Mackay
Deputy Vice-Principal International and Director of Edinburgh Global, The University of Edinburgh, UK
There are profound changes taking place across the world influencing delivery models across higher education and research and presenting new innovative transnational partnership opportunities. What has been the experience at the University of Edinburgh, a large research intensive university in the UK, in engaging in delivering teaching and research through transnational education? What have been the challenges and opportunities, how does this fit with the University's strategic ambition and what does the future hold?

15:40−15:50 Quickfire questions (asked by Moderator) Video bridge

Moderator: Alan Moore
Head of International Affairs and Academic Mobility Office, NUST MISIS, Russia

15:50−16:10 Transnational Education: Notes from Cambridge

Speaker: Karen Ottewell
Director of Academic Development & Training for International Students, University of Cambridge Language Centre, Fellow and Tutor (Graduate) of Lucy Cavendish, UK

Transnational Education is not something that the University of Cambridge has engaged in until very recently when it initiated a Dual Degree programme with the University of Hong Kong.
In this presentation, I will provide an overview of Cambridge's experiences of this relationship, focussing on those aspects required to make such a partnership work, before considering, from my own professional perspective, the linguistic and academic literacy challenges of such programmes.

16:10-16:30 Strategic partnerships in TNE: the case of HSE International College of Economics and Finance (ICEF)

Speaker: Olga Nizhevich
Administrative Head of ICEF Master's programme in Financial Economics, International College of Economics and Finance (ICEF), HSE University, Russia

16:30-16:50

Speaker: Valeriy Rukаvishnikov
Director of the Center for Training and Retraining of Oil and Gas Specialists, Deputy Director for Development, School of Natural Resources, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Russia

16:50-17:10

Speaker: Jim Clarke
Course Director and Senior Lecturer in English and Journalism Coventry University, UK

17:10-17:30 The increasing value of TNE for student outcomes and university partnership

Speaker: Adam Doyle
UEL Director of Careers and Enterprise University of East London

TNE education has become increasing important for professionals, with employers wanting to capitalise on the benefits of TNE to assist a global client case and reach. A particular area where this has been seen has been for academic and professional stages of legal education, where a combination of inter-state agreements and the rise of multinational law firms has led to a range of courses and progression agreements being created to meet student and employer needs.

Whilst the aim is simple, the implementation has however been on occasion rather more complex. Whether it is the fitting together of legal concepts to bridge how various legal themes work, the expectations of students at differing stages of education, or the financial structures required to make any agreement sustainable, careful thought needs to be put into the planning of TNE agreements to ensure their long term attractiveness and end goal success.
17:30-17:40 Quickfire questions. Closing of the Forum
Organisers and Partners